Grange (@1.62) vs Shane O'Neills (@2.63)
06-10-2019

Our Prediction:

Grange will win

Grange – Shane O'Neills Match Prediction | 06-10-2019 11:00

Mabh O'Neill's Camogie Club was founded in 1919. Little is known of its early years, but from 1940 the club participated in the Newry and District Camogie League, reaching the final in 1943. In 1941 it reached the final of the Armagh Camogie Championship, and in 1943 the South Armagh divisional final.

War in Ulster[edit]

J. The nickname "Shane the Proud" (Irish: Sen an Domais), which appears in nineteenth and early twentieth century popular histories, was coined some time after his death by English writers, and originally had the pejorative meaning of "arrogant", because they wished to portray him as vain, self-indulgent and ruthless, and thus undermine the legitimacy of his claim to the earldom of Tyrone.[6]Holinshed's Chronicles of 1587, for instance, had a side-note, "The proud taunts of Shane O'neile", the text remarking that "when the commissioners were sent to intreat with him vpon sundrie points, they found him most arrogant & out of all good order, braieng out speches not met nor semelie."[7] Later Irish writers, such as John Mitchel and P.

During this visit Shane's legal claim to his father Conn Bacach's earldom was verbally confirmed and Shane was led to believe that he would be recognised as the 2nd Earl of Tyrone, though some reservation was made of the possible future rights of Hugh O'Neill, who had succeeded his brother Brian as Baron of Dungannon. However, confirmation of the grant of the earldom was never delivered, and the O'Neill was compelled to defend his hegemony in Ulster when his onetime supporter Sir Henry Sidney was appointed Lord Deputy and resurrected Sussex's policy of undermining the O'Neill's authority. Brian had been killed in a skirmish in April 1562 by Shane's Tanaiste, Turlough Luineach O'Neill.

Elizabeth, whose prudence and parsimony were averse to so formidable an undertaking as the complete subjugation of the powerful O'Neill, desired peace with him at almost any price. An attempt by Sussex to increase the enmity of the O'Donnells against the O'Neill was frustrated by his seizure of Calvagh O'Donnell in a monastery. Elizabeth's faith in Sussex's aggressive strategy diminished when the repeated annual devastations of O'Neill's territory by the Lord Deputy with sizeable and expensive armies failed to bring him to submission.

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There were at this time three powerful contemporary members of the ONeill family in IrelandShane, Turlough, and Hugh, 2nd Earl of Tyrone. Elizabeth at last authorized Sussex to take the field against Shane, but two expeditions failed. Turlough had schemed to supplant Shane during Shanes absence in London. Shane then laid the whole blame for his lawless conduct on the lord deputys repeated alleged attempts on his life. Elizabeth consented to negotiate, and practically all Shanes demands were conceded. The feud did not long survive Shanes return to Ireland, where he reestablished his authority and renewed his turbulent tribal warfare.

Piers travelled to Cushendun to take Shane's head and send it to Dublin Castle. The English Government tried to pass this off as a "drunken brawl" turned savage. His body was possibly later moved to Glenarm Abbey. Here, on 2 June 1567, he was killed by the MacDonnells, and his headless body was buried at Crosskern Church at Ballyterrim above Cushendun. Unbeknownst to Shane, The Scots had already come to an agreement with Henry Sidney and William Piers, Seneschal of Clandeboye, commander of the English garrison at Carrickfergus. Attended by a small body of gallowglass, and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast, hoping to propose an alliance. Failing in an attempt to arrange terms, and also in obtaining the help which he solicited from France, the O'Neill was utterly routed by the O'Donnells again at the battle of Farsetmore near Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

Unable to succeed against O'Neill in battle, Sussex tried in 1561 to assassinate him using poisoned wine. The O'Neill now called the lord deputy to account for his unnatural enmity, as displayed in this most recent of many attempts on his life. The O'Neill destroyed the greater part of Sussex's invasion army at the Battle of the Red Sagums, 18 July 1561, while Sussex was deep in O'Neill-controlled territory garrisoning Armagh with a small body of men. Afterwards Elizabeth sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with the O'Neill, who was demanding a complete withdrawal of the English from his territory.

Early life[edit]

There, by premeditated treachery or in a sudden brawl, he was slain by the MacDonnells. The English invaded Donegal and restored ODonnell. This victory strengthened Shane ONeills position, but the English made preparations for his subjugation. Attended by a small body of retainers and taking his prisoner Sorley Boy with him, he presented himself among the MacDonnells near Cushendun, on the Antrim coast. Shane then turned his hand against the MacDonnells, claiming that he was serving the Queen of England in harrying the Scots. He fought an indecisive battle with Sorley Boy MacDonnell near Coleraine in 1564, and in 1565 he routed the MacDonnells and took Sorley Boy prisoner near Ballycastle. ONeill was routed by the ODonnells at Letterkenny; and seeking safety in flight, he threw himself on the mercy of his enemies, the MacDonnells.

Shane was inaugurated as the O'Neill. The case for Mathew's disqualifying status under both English and Irish law, as an affiliated member of the family rather than as an actual son of Conn Bacach,[16] was carefully stated by Shane when he made his own claim to the title of Earl of Tyrone both before and during his visit to Queen Elizabeth in 1562,[17] and restated in some detail by the English authorities when Hugh O'Neill was outlawed during the Nine Years War. In English law this was an illegal usurpation of the rulership of Ulster. But according to Gaelic Irish law (derbfine), Shane had every claim to be chief of the name.

4, 1562. Accompanied by Ormonde and Kildare he reached London on Jan. Elizabeth, who was not prepared to undertake the subjugation of the Irish chieftain, urgently desired peace with him, especially when the devastation of his territory by Sussex brought him no nearer to submission. Sussex was not supported by the queen, who sent the Earl of Kildare to arrange terms with Shane. Elizabeth temporized; but finding that Shane was in danger of becoming a tool in the hands of Spanish intriguers, she permitted him to return to Ireland, recognizing him as the ONeill, and chieftain of Tyrone. The latter agreed to present himself before Elizabeth.